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College Recruiting

Ep. 48: 567 Academy with Paul Reddick | A Baseball Podcast

Geoff Rottmayer March 16, 2020 2


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567 Academy with Paul Reddick

Welcome to The Baseball Awakening Podcast, where we dive into the raw, unfiltered, unsexy side of player development

Guest Bio:

Paul Reddick, Baseball Education Center, and 567 Show.

Summary:

On this episode, Host Geoff Rottmayer sits down with Paul Reddick and we talk about Paul youth days, coaching, and what he is currently doing with the 567 Academy.

Show Notes: In this conversation, Paul talks about:

  • His youth days as a baseball player.
  • How he got into coaching.
  • His experience with not having grades and being able to play.
  • The impact his coach had on him but not giving him a pass.
  • How he went about getting started in the online business.
  • The mentors he has had that had an impact on him.
  • The 567 Academy that he is currently working hard on.
  • He put me through the 567process and it’s powerful.
  • What parents are seeking from coaches.
  • What he sees as the future in baseball.
  • and much more.

Website: www.baseballawakening.com

Facebook: Baseball Awakening Podcast

Twitter: Baseball Awakening Podcast

Instagram: The Baseball Awakening Podcast

Email Address: geoff@baseballawakening.com

Geoffrey Rottmayer
On today’s show, I sit down with Paul Reddick. We’re talking about Dave, how he got into coaching. The 567 Academy they have a world where he these things going

Intro
Welcome to another episode of the baseball awakening podcast where we dive into the raw, unfiltered unsexy side of player development. Get ready for some knowledge bombs with your host, Geoff Rottmayer. Welcome to

Geoffrey Rottmayer
baseball wake me podcast. I’m Geoff Rottmayer. And today, I’m sitting down with Paul Reddick. He has the baseball Education Center online, the 567 Academy, as well as having his own podcast The 567 Show, Paul,

Paul Reddick
how are you sir? I’m doing well. Geoff, how are you?

Geoffrey Rottmayer
I’m doing great. You know, Paul, you are a guy that had no some amazing work in the baseball community. And you continue to do so providing a lot of value to a lot of coaches and players. So having been at this thing for as long as you have, and now looking at it from the look of things that look like you’re really focusing in on the 567, pitcher in the 567 dad program, and I love the concept, I understand the concept of it. And I think it’s great considering the nature of youth baseball, and how different it is. And I want to talk a lot about that today. But let’s just kind of start with Paul Reddick, the youth player. And then Paul Reddick going into coaching.

Paul Reddick
Well, it’s the first part of the hurt quick. So, you know, I was I was really probably an average kid growing up. I had a brother who was a terrific player. And so I spent most of my life like we all do want it to be like my brother, so Between somewhere in like eighth grade, seventh, eighth grade, ninth grade, somewhere in there after a little league, it kind of clicked for me like that, oh, you actually have to like work hard to actually have to do all these things. And so I kind of willed myself into a player. And I had a unique pedigree. I grew up on the campus of Seton Hall University, my mom worked there. So I was at that campus, like, I don’t know, all the time. And so I I used to spend my summers there at the baseball camp like however many weeks there were in the summer, and I as a kid, I like took batting practice with like Craig Biggio and move on john Valentyn. And like I thought every kid did that stuff. I didn’t know so I had this like incredible pedigree of growing up around this program and seeing all university that my brother went on to play for but so in seventh and eighth grade, my brother kind of became a star player at Seton Hall prep. And like I wanted that to write I want to be like my brother, so I willed myself to be a great player. My fresh You’re at St. Paul prep so it could not have went better. Had a great year. And the summer time I was put on the team with the varsity players the like main roster, the 18 roster, so I was like on my way. And then my sophomore year I fell off the baseball team. I couldn’t get the grades together. And you know, that was probably the best worst thing that ever happened to me. And my junior year I fell off again. And my senior year I was actually did make the grades and two weeks before baseball tryouts. I got chickenpox. So if when you’re 17 and you have chickenpox, it’s big deal serious. And now, so that was kind of the you know, and believe me, the chickenpox were not the reason I did not really continue to play baseball. So I was an average you know, an average player that’s just, you know, a really screwed up a lot of things but the best thing that ever happened to me was failing off the baseball because That’s when I got a peek into this other side of baseball. So my coach at the time, Mike Shepard Jr, who’s still the coach there. I’m 45. So could you kind of some context of that. So while he had these videotapes, VHS tapes, that he would allow us to sign out and sign back in for us to learn. And so because I couldn’t play on the team, I would sign out these videotapes. And like, I would watch the page from Tom house and Gordy Gillespie and Ron Polk and all that. What was his name from Miami? I can’t remember his name depiction is clear as Mark Mark, Mark. Mark was a Stanford I can’t remember Gosh, Coach Miami. But I saw this other side of baseball. And so the foundation for me as a coach really lies in those days roughly Wait a minute, there’s more just doing it but there’s actually like some tactics with some science behind it and some stuff and I just remember that being You know, kind of like the first time you know you hear your favorite music group write something just sounds different about them and that that was that experience for me so and you tell me where you want to go into my coaching days because it’s actually quite funny.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Yeah let’s jump into that.

Paul Reddick
Yeah so I was 17 years old for senior at Seton Hall prep. I had just I was sick of the 140 pounds quite honestly did not think I had much of a future in anything like I thought I was gonna go work at you know, I don’t know 711 or UPS or something like that. That’s just what I do. And because like nothing had worked out for me like I wasn’t a great student I was in a hard school you know looking back on see all prep really possible. So maybe in another school I would have been an average student but but so I really kind of 17 year old kid with really no future and but I did like this girl. Her name was rose and she was the scorekeeper for the freshman baseball team at rose up Catholic High School. And a lot of the kids that I grew up with in New Jersey, they would went to that school. I went to see Hall prep because my mom worked there. And so I used to drive from Seton Hall prep to go I would, I wasn’t very swift at picking up girls or asking people out, I went to an all boys school, Irish Catholic kid. These skills are not taught, right. So I used to show up at the game. And I guess now you would call it stalking. And just to sit there long enough, maybe that she would notice me or say hi to her and talk to her. That was my plan was I would just stay around long enough that you would get the point. So the coach that seems a guy named brother john, my brother, Jonathan, a priest, a brother, and he would see me at these games and like I was the only one of these games the middle Warren eco park at Roselle, New Jersey. And he would say like, he caught up with your brother on the team family members like now and I’m like, Well what are you doing here? I’m gonna go well, like I’m here to support rose. Yeah, she’s she’s the scorekeeper. I’m here to support her. And he was kind of like, Ah, that’s pretty Yeah. Like he like, here’s a here’s essentially a priest telling me like, I have no mood, right. And so, so he goes, What do you want? I want to help out with the team. Yeah, sure. And so I started hitting fungos and helping out, throw down practice. And he asked me, he said, You know, there’s this kid on the team Conrad, you struggling a little bit, you’re gonna lose this position, unless you start hitting. Maybe you can work on them, motivate them, you’re young, you’re closer to the age. And so I did, and I would just, I just kind of did everything that I was taught to do by my coaches at that point. And Connor next game came around and Conrad got up to the plate, and like, I probably as nervous as I ever was, and he hits the first ball up the middle for bass hit. And you know, he he rounded The first base and he looked back and he pointed at me. Like, thank you. I’m like, and it was like my soul took its first breath. Yeah, you know, I just knew on that day that God had made me a coach and that’s and that’s what I was supposed to do. So that started that was that was so from you know I’m a Christian man so I believe all the all these things work out this way and yeah, some kind of very glad Idid not succeed as a player.So yeah, that’s that’s how I started.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Awesome Let’s jump back and talk about the issue that you had in school keeping the grades up you know obviously that’s a lesson that you learn and can share from you know something that you can speak from experience in teaching kids. So how did this conversation in teaching the kids that, hey, look, your grades are super important. But then they look at you and see what you’ve been able to accomplish. Yes. How does that conversation go?

Paul Reddick
So I, you know, I’ve used that story a lot, even though it didn’t work out for me in the long term. But, you know, it does make for a nice kind of story when you tell it all at once. Yeah, but part of a lot of the reason why I succeeded as a coach was because of the people that I’ve met along the way. I had a mentor named jack burns, who was like a second father to me still is, and he was like, you know, the Dean of coaches in unique at the time took me under his wing, it really guided me. I had another mentor Tom house and Ray Korn. And then I eventually worked for Yogi Berra. So I had a lot of great people that helped me along that way. But I have told the story about failing off the team, to thousands of kids. And I know that story happened for a reason because because I do now have, you know, a drum to beat to the world. And I’ve never hidden. I never hidden that story, because I know what it impacts can have. So what I do tell the kids is as much as like when you tell it as a whole long story is, you know, God has a plan for everybody. And that’s true. Yeah. But I’ll tell you that I remember sitting on the bus. Today I fell off the baseball team, I had to go into my locker and take out my stuff. And I went I I left with first class for the last class today very early so I can get into my locker before my teammates came, I had to get on the bus to go home. And I remember them walking down the hill to our practice field and the bus pulling away. And you know, there are those are my guys, those are my buddies who played together for a better part of two years. And you know, they were going to practice and I was going home, and I was embarrassed and I had let them down. You know, I probably would have, you know, I don’t know how it worked out. But I like to think I’d have been a good contributor on that team. So for all the hearts all worked out man, that was a very difficult difficult time of my life. My, you know, sophomore, junior senior year high school. And sohere’s, you know, I believe that all kids are more than baseball players. But yeah, you know, had I rewrite history, you know, I probably would have liked you a play, you know, even though it didn’t work out that way, but I still feel like I don’t want to think about that time. I still I’ll never forget. Two guys in particular Dom status, you know, and john McNish who I probably have not seen her talk to you since high school but I remember specifically looking at them and going man like those are my my buddy they’re going to practice not let him down. So yeah, it’s as much as I tell the story worked out well there it was hard You know, it was it wasn’t easy.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Right. So so your your high school coach, you know, with with him letting you check out the videos and the book. He obviously wanted something for you. You So what What impact did he have in the role that he played in your life at that time? And how did it shape the direction things have gone for you?

Paul Reddick
So you know, my coaches Mike separate junior in high school. And so his father was Mike Shepherd senior who was the coach of Seton Hall University. So it was like this family this, this baseball family that and I had grown up in and I remember going in that day, when I found that I, I failed and asked him to he could talk to the teacher to get me extra credit or something to do. And I’m like begging him and I may I may have been crying. I don’t remember there was definitely some welling up in there. You know, because, like in that position to like my mother was a doctor, a professor at Yale University. My brother was a superstar baseball player at Seton Hall University and here I am like moron, you know, and, and he said to me, he said, No, I wouldn’t do it. I remember saying like, I’ve seen you do this for other kids. I’ve heard this. And he said something to the effect, but all those other kids were working up to their potential. And you’re not. And you know, at the time, right, we never want to lessen the time, right? We never want to eat our spinach, but we know in long term so you know, as far as that goes, like, yeah, I’m glad he didn’t get me that grade. Yeah, yeah. I’m, like, the time I want it to me. I probably cursed all the way out, you know, things being unfair to me, but he was doing the best thing for me. Yeah. Yeah. So yeah, I mean, that was that was super, super important. You know, for me at that time, yeah. So now you’re getting into coaching and stuff.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
You know, coaching in the tough road, it’s tough to make it tough to make money. And it just taught me and when you’re in it, but you know, the one of the things that when you’re in it, you just love it. So Can you talk a little bit about your coaching path? And, you know, some of the, the online businesses that you started along the way?

Paul Reddick
Yeah, what I would also say is that I always say this when I talk about coaching, if anyone’s listening to this, if you can stop coaching, um, I would if you’re a coach, and you can stop doing it, I would stop doing it. Yeah. If you can bring yourself to stop doing it, you should stop because a true coach or real coach cannot stop under any circumstance. Right? Right now, if it is, if it is in you to not coach and you could just say, you know what, I can I don’t need this. And I think you should go into something else. Yeah, because it you really it really has to be in your soul to really do it. So um, after that, I, I got a position I was an assistant baseball coach with the junior American Legion or junior American Roselle, American Legion I met the guy said toward jack burns, who became My second father, and jack You know, he saw something in me and that I didn’t certainly didn’t see myself at that time. And he would tell me every day that I was going to be a star. I was going to be a star coach and I was young, he would encourage me and and they’re getting emotional thing about the guy. I love them so much, because I wouldn’t be here. I wouldn’t be here today if it was not for jack Byrnes because he really turned that around for me. And so the first year I coach with him, he said, You stand right next to me, you stand right next to me. And because jack had other coaches, jack always had a bunch of other coaches. He was developing, you know, and he’s like, you stand next to me and you don’t you say one foot for me all the time, and I did for whole summer. And what he would do is you’d say, you see that guy, so he made this out, you should not have taken you know, this guy should have backed up and see that it was too far too close to the pictures. Don’t do this. When you work on practice. You got to know all these different things. The second year, the second He put me at first base. And he taught me how to coach first. It was just like insane to think about today, right? Yeah, right. We’ll stay in there, right. But he taught me was like when a kid my kid guides back, he’s got to test this part of the base. He’s got to look over his, his, you know, his left shoulder. So to look for a pass ball, and you got to remind him of the count and the strikes and the outs and where he’s gonna go on the ground ball, we’re gonna go over all these things, right? And then the second yard coach, third base, he taught me how to get signed and he taught me how to manage runners on base path. He taught me how to construct an offense and to develop a lineup and he and then the fourth year he let me run the whole thing. And and he was still the head coach, don’t you know, there’s no there’s no there’s no other head coach when you’re gonna do like jack burns on the field. He’s, and but but and then when I after those four years, he kicked me out. He kicked me out and he kicked me out of the nest. There was no more for him to teach me knew that. And so through his connections, I was able to connect with a guy named Ray corn. And Ray corn was the head coach of Elizabeth High School, which was the biggest High School in New Jersey. And I was an assistant there for Ray for two years. This is a powerhouse program a couple national titles in the in the 80s and 90s. Dozens of players drafted all kinds of state catching on and you’re one of those guys like one like valve. And so I worked with him for two years. And so for the first six years of my coaching career, I had these two mentors that just taught me everything, and I feel sorry for coaches, we’re starting to that. Yeah, because the first six years of my life of my coaching career, every mistake I made was a winner off on someone else’s record. You know, not if I made a mistake waiver the guy in didn’t count last encounter me but and what and I don’t say that to be like, you know, wise guy or anything but I made my mistake under the guidance to someone else. And when I made a mistake, jack burns, you just say you’re stupid too much. So to me, that was his that was a nicest way of him saying like, but he would come back and say, here’s what you should have done. Yeah. And I feel I feel sorry for coaches to start today because if I were a coach starting out today, probably two years into it, I’d have my own tournament team and you know, now you don’t know how to coach and now you’re trying to coach pressure situations and all that kind of stuff. So I was very grateful for though for that. So that was those are the first six years of my coaching career.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Awesome, man. It’s nice to have a mentor type to learn from to ask question and fail, which is huge. And you know, pretty young coach, are there really any coaches that are listening to this? You know, I highly recommend seeking out mentors. They’re great, and allow them to be hard on you and to push you to be great. So now, Paul, While you while you’re coaching you get into the the online world can you talk about that a little bit?

Paul Reddick
Yeah so so um so after after Elizabeth high was that I was the head baseball coach at Union Catholic for a few years but I transitioned into professional baseball coaching and scouting and doing all that and when you’re scouting, right you don’t make any money you don’t pay anything really when you’re starting out or just whatever base expenses so so there’s no like you don’t make any money doing that people It looks like a glamour shot from the outside is really not. And so when you’re doing these things, and you’re young young coach and you’re scouting your coaches, you have to do a million things to piece together some kind of livable income, right, right. And, and throughout most of this time, I was I was living in my grandmother’s attic and just just happy is like could be and so so I was giving camps clinics lesson any way that I could right to piece together an income so I wrote a book with Tom house or could we co wrote a book called The picture perfect pitcher. And we did a few, we did a series of videos. And so basically what we did is we that was the first thing we, we were, we were selling those videos, our first website with a PDF, which is a print out mailing with a check. And so this is one thing kind of led to another and the internet kind of took off. We were there at the right time. We started basically publishing what was my system for pitching that I was doing with my offline pitchers. I ran a year round pitching program. And we just put that on VHS tapes it first and then DVDs and then digital. And then it just it just kind of really evolved over the years into now like obviously much larger digital platform. Where we publish a lot of other coaches work with a lot a lot of other inventors and products and equipment. We have a lot of times coaches that we work with to do their marketing to everything. So it just kind of evolved. It was not by plan. Honestly, what I was trying to do that if I could have made, you know, like 40 bucks a day, that would have been great. That would have given me like, one lesson left less than that I had to do every day, you know? Yeah. So it just kind of evolved from there. And it just got to a tipping point where I was doing so many lessons, so many clinics, so many camps. I was 50 pounds heavier than I was I am today. And I was drinking for 20 ounce Starbucks coffees per day, at the height of all that to stay. Yeah. And then you know what you have to do to come down from that right. So I was coming home and having a couple beers and stuff like that and alcohol and Redick do not. It’s not an equation that is your claim. Does does anything positive in history? No. So yes, we’re just kind of evolved at the right time and then we just took the leap. So all right, I’m gonna try and make this really go and we did Open stingrays a lot.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Yeah, yeah. No, I mean when I when I got into coaching man I bought shoes I bought I bought every single thing that was on your site. And you know if there was something out there on baseball, I’m messing it because I realized pretty quick like when I got done playing that coating a plane is vastly different. So now you have taken a direction that I really like with the 567 program. And I follow that and I think, you know, with the current culture, and how different it is, you know, the kids are getting harder to relate to because of what they are growing up with. So keen talk a little bit about what the 567 is and what you’re doing with it. Yeah, so

Paul Reddick
I it’s hard to really pinpoint exactly when but probably somewhere in the five four or five years ago I would make time in my schedule to, you know, just anybody could call me they could set up a call and talk about anything. And I didn’t know what they’re gonna say when they pick up the phone, I pick up the phone, but just like any customers, actually anybody, not only customers are like, and the reason why I did that is because there were a lot of people who took my call. A lot of people that took my call, I figured out just as a side note, I figured out very early. I listen to a radio show. I think it was Augie Garrido, who was on the radio show. And it was like eight o’clock in the morning or something like that. And he was talking about how he was the only person in the office. He gets there at 7am. And he always, always the only person in the office for a couple hours needs to get work done. And I was like, Huh. So if I call baseball office at 730 in the morning, there’s nobody there. There’s no assistant, no administrators or anything. It’s kind of like, and I stumbled upon a loophole that if I called Mike Martin and Mark Mark with skip boatman and Augie Garrido, and all these guys at seven o’clock in the morning, they were in the office and no one else was there. So if the phone rang if you had to, if your phone rings at seven o’clock in the morning, and you’re at the office, you, you got to think it’s your wife, right? Or you pick up the phone, so these guys would pick up the phone, right? And I would talk to them. And I would ask them all kinds of questions and probably like, yeah, it was probably about here, this kid again, you know, like, but I was grateful that so I’ll never forget that, that a lot of people pick up the phone for me. I’m always grateful for that. So I always want to make that opportunity available. And so what I’ve noticed, what I noticed is that I used to get questions on like, what do I do for my kids is training for you know, whatever High School season or need to throw a curveball or use a throw harder or whatever it was. Those are the questions I was getting at. And then they started to shift. Their sort of shift like I don’t know what to say to my son after we talk a lot about I don’t know, my knee my son or not, we’re arguing a lot over baseball. My son must quit baseball. I have an eight year old. I don’t know what the next step for him is. I don’t know if I should put him on a tournament team or travel team and I’m, I’m hearing all these different opinions. And it was just it was a total shift. And what happened was the game that our fathers play you and I gotta imagine we’re probably around the same age, right? Yeah. So the game that our fathers played, and the game that we played, were probably the same. Ours are probably a little more organized than theirs were but they played, you know, in the spring, they played a bus season. There was a count ornament account championship on July 4. There was an all star team that maybe played a couple weeks in the Cooperstown thing and then were eliminated. And then everybody went on vacation in August and see you next spring. Right. So our fathers could guide us through that process. They could mentor us and tell us well here’s how to you know You know, all that kind of stuff. So what happens is that now the game is completely different, right? radically different. So now the father is looking at the game, their son is playing completely different and he has no experience. You know, finally she’s got no background to help or guide his son through it. So I’ve had a father say to me, my little league team practice three times a week during the season, when I was a kid, my son team practice three days a week in the offseason. One father say, fathers tell me that I never played a championship game in my life. It seems like my son plays in them all the time. And I don’t know what to say to him. You know, when we were kids, there weren’t many opportunities for championship game drivers, only raffle opportunities per year, right? I’m so so from that perspective of fathers. Our fathers certainly evolved. Not only that communication system that we have is different. So, a father, you know, we went outside, we talked, we played, we interacted, the most disconnected communication that we had was a telephone call.

And now kids today text snap, tweet, comment, like, share, they have a completely different communication system. Yeah. So the father today can be a little bit long, in not only how to guide his son in the game, but how to guide his son like through life, because the advice our fathers gave to us, was probably the advice their fathers gave to them. We cannot pass that same advice on to our children. It is a completely different world that they’re living in. So that’s what kind of started us down that path to really focus on on on just helping dad first and foremost, raise your sons in the right way. Oh, my dogs are driving me nuts. There’s somebody out But, but also to like how do we make the most of the game without, without burning our kids out without, you know, making them dislike the game or doing too much too soon, you know. And so those are those are kind of things I spend most of my time now. I actually don’t run the day to day operations of baseball Education Center anymore. I spent most of my day now coaching Dad, you know, it’s like, God may be a coach, I thought he made me a baseball coach, that was part of it. But really now like, I feel like the coaching dad men on either how to create relationships for their son recreate or just start one from scratch, or even just helping them get their family or their team, you know, organizing on the same page, like in this kind of new world. We’re all in so

Geoffrey Rottmayer
that’s nice. You know, I find myself doing that. You know that the conversation, like you said, has gone from talking baseball, to we’re not even really talking about Baseball anymore. It’s been more about the the communication and the relating part. And top like you said, you know, because the world is so different, but can you? The world is just so different. So. So with your 567, can you can you expand on that? What did the 567 I mean?

Paul Reddick
Yeah, so the best way I could do it is to do it for you. Okay, that’s how you do it. So So, um, what would be something like so let’s take this podcast, what would be a goal that you would have with this podcast? Like a hard goal, not just like a life changing world like a hard goal?

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Because the goal was to learn and to get my stuff out there a little bit.

Paul Reddick
Okay, so let’s go like so to get yourself out. There is really that hard goal, right? You want to get out there, right? And be still Okay, so we’re gonna play a game. Yep. replay game. Are you the type of coach that just wants to play games? Or do you want whinging or pray again, you don’t want to wait What do you want to win but you want to play? Well, let’s play to win this one. Okay, by the way, here’s I’m gonna do I’m gonna, I’m gonna ask you the same question six times in a row. And the way to win the game is speed. You give me the first word or two, that pops into your mind as fast as you can never know. What’s important to you about getting yourself out there? In order to my business? Yeah. What about your business? Like to grow it? Yep. Okay. So to really grow your business, right, but what’s important, what’s important to you about being a man who grows his business to provide for my family?

Yeah. So what’s important to you, in order to about being a man who’s able to provide for his family?

Geoffrey Rottmayer
My daughter

Paul Reddick
What about her

Geoffrey Rottmayer
To be able to give her some stability in life,

Paul Reddick
okay? So you want to give your daughter stability in life. What’s important to you about giving your daughter stability in life? What’s important to you about being a father who gives his daughter stability?

Now, this is where it gets tough. This is why it’s the 567.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
This

Paul Reddick
is our four or a four and this is where it gets tough. We’re on 515 right now. So what? Yeah, so what’s important to you about being a father who provides his daughter with the ability to you in order to shoot

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Yeah, so she can

Man, this is tough, Paul.

Paul Reddick
Here’s why it’s tough. And here’s why it’s tough because this is probably the first time that you’ve been asked questions at this level. Yeah. So what we’re getting to now and I’ll explain to you that we are the basis of it, but I’ll explain to you why it is. But I want you to think out one word about why it’s important for you to be a father who provides his daughter with stability.

Intro
Receive a baseball awakening decal by subscribing on iTunes and leaving an objective review to claim your decals, screenshot the review and email it to Jeff at baseball awakening.com. That’s GE o FF at baseball. awakening.com. And we’ll get that your way.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
It’s my duty. Yeah.

Paul Reddick
duty as a father, yeah. So what’s important to you about being a father who takes care of his duties

in order to

Geoffrey Rottmayer
so that she knows that I care and love her.

Paul Reddick
Yeah, yeah. She knows what’s important to you about being a man father, whose daughter knowsher father loves her. important about thatin order to

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Right there

Paul Reddick
if you’re looking back, you’re combing gray hair, you’re on a rocking chair. You’re looking back and you were provided that stability.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
What would that what would that mean to you what was important about that as you look back on it.

Paul Reddick
Now, the longer you take with it, the more meaningful the word is.

The longer take more meaningful, more

Yeah, because you’re getting it deeper inside of you.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
I feel like you go back to, you know, her having the lifestyle that she can be proud of or be proud of me and or go on and kind of do her own thing. Yeah, so so sometimes like it that she’ll know you laid a foundation for her. Right? Does that sound good? Yeah.

Paul Reddick
So here’s the thing. Here’s why it takes so long to get to 567 because and this is why this is why the work that I’ve done with guys over the last four years has been so meaningful for me more more meaningful than anything I’ve done is that so if let’s say we were in a coaching situation together and and I’m you came to me for coaching as As many dads do, even business owners do, and I say, we’re gonna talk about working on your podcast. Now I do a podcast talking hard. It seems like people really realize, right, it’s hard to have that do interviews prepared. It’s not just you just don’t show up doesn’t all come out perfectly right? Like, right making, making music, right? It’s not it’s not a formula to it, right? But if I say to you, it makes you doing that is going to be hard. There’s gonna be times where you’re gonna have to put in extra work editing things, marketing, things moving, maybe taking some racing chances. And if you focus on the success of your podcast, you will stop when things get super, super hard.

With our coaching you I say to you, Jeff, you’re not doing a podcast here. I want you to focus on the foundation as you are laying for your daughter. So that when she sees what you’ve accomplished, you’re a model for her. She’s know you love her and you believe Is your duty of the Father by providing her that ability? Now, would you be ready to go to work? Absolutely not. Yeah. So, so we stay at the level of your podcast is always going to be to do with work organization, right. But if I can get you to the level of what’s your deepest needs for you? What’s most true about you? And just want to compliment you to that the people that take the longest to answer are the ones that have the deepest and most rooted feelings. Because they’re there just because they’re, you know, they’re, they’re just much more meaningful. Yeah, you know, to them that the words have the words are so difficult to match the feeling. So, if I, if I am, so when we, when we motivate players, or we motivate anybody, we do all the wrong things. We say we think what motivates us will motivate them. So what motivates me one motivate you, motivated your dad not motivate you. Right? And so oftentimes parents will say like when I was a kid, all I want to do is go out and throw the ball get the ball. All these kids want to do is watch their eyes as well. Yeah, cuz you didn’t have iPads. You know, we didn’t have anything right. So we went outside and these kids have distractions, they have interference. The second thing is we think what should or what motivates others will motivate them. You know, we always have that Robo baseball kid that’s in every town. Right? The kid like wakes up four o’clock in the morning, take 5000 swing workout for an hour drinks cold pressed juice from the Himalayas. And then he goes to school and then he the mental game coach picks him up he does a session on the way the cages he works out again there’s another 5000 swing and then he goes to bed listening to by neural beats of line drive. Right We all there’s always a kid right? And we we could hold him up as an example of like, wow, we have dedicated focus that kid First of all, my phone rings an awful lot. When a kid like that hits a wall and when They hit a wall. It’s usually pretty ugly because there’s usually some something unhealthy fueling that kind of motivation. Second thing is every time we tell our kids they should be some they should be like somebody else we’re telling about who they are. It’s not important. We’re not good enough. And I cringe at the times of coach as a as a coach. When I look back and say, Maddie, you need to put out more like Mikey Mikey more like Teddy, you know, I cringe I think about the things I said to kids. And then the third motivation mistake that we think what should motivate them or motivate them. So if I got a room full of 16 year old baseball players, and I said, Who wants to play the one, every hand goes up, right? Because their hand went up, I might make a mistake that that’s what will motivate them. Which is not true at all. Because I’m so I was walk through the video some guy posted on online, and it was his baseball coach. He was yelling at his team, and they were kind of dragging, dragging a little bit in practice. He’s yelling, he’s chewing him out. And he’s saying, Oh, you got plenty Energy. When you get to your girlfriend’s house tonight, there’s a team that’s gonna work hard right now, and we’re gonna teach you but when it comes back, and then he pointed to like someone else off camera. And so you see that guy, he’s been to the show, he did his work, he got his butt. And then the team like, got up and started running, or make calls. And all that is fear, manipulation and comparing you to somebody else, but somebody else somehow has a better life. And that some team is going to outwork you and they’re going to beat you, or that you’re going to miss an opportunity. So that is fear and manipulation at its highest. So that’s enough to get it going. Not enough to keep it going. Yeah. And so, um, the problem with that is that when you when you set the foundation of your motivation around fear, as a coach or as a father, you’re going to have that on your to do list forever. Because you got to scare him to 10 minutes later, go scare him again. You’re gonna yell at him again. You’re gonna yell at him every practice, you know, why would we yell and why would we guess when we could take two minutes to find out What’s most important to the kids? So if I got a kid who’s let’s say his number seven is like the payback his grandma who I don’t know, maybe helped raise him or something. Now, the D one scholarship might be in that kid’s head, but grandma’s in his heart, right? And if I go over to him, and if I go over to him, and I say, hey, Johnny, Look, I know today’s tough day for you, but I want you to dig in. We’re gonna practice like grandma’s over there watching us today. So I got him. Yeah, I got it. All I did was I just I gave back to him. What he told me was most important to him when he needed it the most. That is positive, productive leverage, you can create a motivated player for life. If you can find out what is most deeply important to that player. Now I don’t have to mess around with all that mumbo jumbo. I don’t have to stare him up to put up motivational posters. I just go right to what is true for him. And when we talk about getting into deeper levels of the heart As a coach, a sports person, we want our kids to be mentally tough. And we want our kids to discipline but everything we love about sports is about the heart. Yeah, nobody says boy that guy played with a lot of intellect. Right right now they talked about that guy played with heart right that guy played with heart he played with passion. He even Mariano Rivera who was about ice cold right there was still like, there was a there was a spirit about him. And every sports movie we like you. Watch miracle watch, you know, Mighty Ducks. I defy any grown man to watch Rudy and not cry. And we’d like that because because Rudy was a 567. guy. He does he found something deeper about him and and as I coach people, one of the things is that I try and keep clients of mine focused on if you like, movie Rudy, you don’t like you? Because it’s a great movie, it’s not that great of a movie. Quality, right? No, you like it because it touches something that’s true about you. It touches something so deeply true about you. You can watch Rudy. There’s only there’s only a few movies. It’s like Rocky, Rudy and stepbrothers, right are the only three ways you can watch Oh, they get better every time you watch them. Right. And so and that’s why because it touches that heart. You know, it touches that part of us, that is the most special. And so, when I do I do this with dads, and I also do it with songs, you know? And it’s sometimes it is totally You and I, Jeff, for the rest of our lives will remember this moment, you could never be able to really hear this. Again, we’ll have a relationship in some way. Even if we didn’t talk or whatever. You’ll remember this because this was probably the first time someone taken the time to really ask you some really deep questions. So as a coach or the father, if you’re doing this with your son, or I’m doing it with them with their son, whoever is you’re tapping into things that most people never tap into. So as a coach, as a coach, if you want your players to lay out for you get dirty, play hard, win games, tap into something that no one else has tapped into. And they will go they will play their rear ends off for you because you because they know you’ve seen what’s truly important to them. You’re not just holding up some D one scholarship or fear that they might miss out. In front of,

Geoffrey Rottmayer
you know, Paul, I think to a level maybe not the bad six, seven, but I mean, you know, with my kids, I probably get to two, two and three. And but now that I’ve seen, you know, I’ve listened to your show and stuff I’ve seen I’ve heard how powerful is but now that I’ve See how powerful it is? Since it’s been done on me? I think I need to try to go a little further to 567. So, you know, Paul, let me ask you this, you know, for several years, I had teams and I have several parents jump on me for not yelling at the kid. And I was like, really, dude, I’m trying to teach your kid how to play some baseball and do things the right way. You know, we’re focusing on the big picture, and why we’re doing what we’re doing. You know, so for the parents that are listening, and they’re saying, You know what, I need a coach that can motivate my kid by yelling at them and stuff. You know what, why is that approach desired by some parents.

Paul Reddick
So with a parent, he really tried to tell you if I need someone to reach a level, read the reach something inside of my son that I know he’s capable of, but I’ve yet to bring out That’s what they’re really hoping to do. And they’re hoping that if somebody just motivates them yells at them, it’ll wake up something that they know is inside of them. So. So it really kind of hard weird to say. But one of the things one of the byproducts has come out of the work I’ve done with a lot of dads is, I work with them for a little while, and I work with their songs. And they decide to quit baseball. Yeah. Because they don’t want to play baseball. Right? They want when they were a kid, they liked it when they were a little kid, you know, now they’re 10 1112 or 13. And they’re like, Hey, I won’t do it anymore. I was just doing it because we’re doing it together. Like, like, I’ve had situations where the fun like I’ve been just doing it, because you like it and thought as a way I’m just doing it. You like it? Yeah. Like it. Oh, let’s go to the movies. Right? Yeah. And so and so first of all, I would start with where’s that exterior pressure? You know what, why is it important that somebody if your son is not naturally motivated to move towards something Barring any like exterior thing, you might want to look at what he’s doing. So I’ve never seen so many people surprise my son’s on play baseball. And it doesn’t look like they will and I could care less. Right I so I have taken I’ve taken approach bait mainly because I get this kind of bigger view of things that anything that my son sons are going to do I want their motivation to be naturally generated, be self generated motivation, I don’t ever want to put them in a situation where they feel like they have to be something for Dad, you know, this was my life, not their like my father was not a baseball person. So, my father was in publishing, I guess I went into publishing but that was different way. But the but but that’s, that’s, that’s for me. So I would look for if you have a constant motivation problem with your song, I would look at your activity. I would look at the activity doing whether he really wants to do it. Now if there’s you know, But what they’re really saying is they want somebody yell at them, they really want to tap into that. So I would suggest you start with a 567. Because I’ve had players that I’ve worked with in this for so long that when they couldn’t turn them on, and it turned on, I tell the story, I’ll come to the first one they ever did. I was working with this pitcher, and, like, ever worked with me so long that you’re frustrated, and like, now you’re frustrated over the frustration. Yeah. And, and that was the first 567 I ever did. I did it with a dad. And man, that kid lit up. That kid lit up because his father at the end of his 567, much like yours as far as like, I just love my son. And that was the first time the son had hadn’t heard his father articulated that way. And also, like they’re pressing on these goals and kids had to play at higher levels. And so all that was gone. Wait a minute, you’re just here because you love me, give me the ball and never forget that kid take the ball. And like his whole body language change that and during that lesson that he pitched that day. And so I was looking forward that the other reason why yelling doesn’t work is that not All kids listen the same way. So here’s something you do with all your players and you can do with your children. You can just just in any conversation, like ask them questions you like, tell me about the Yankee game last night or tell me about the last game or what you think about our season last year. And when when you ask him that question, watch where their eyes go. Their eyes go up. They’re bringing forth pictures. They’re bringing forward images, they’re up in their brain. If they kind of turn to the side, they’re trying to hear they’re they’re hearing things. They’re trying to remember things that they heard, they look down there, look, they’re going into their feelings. They’re trying to look into their feelings. So they look up. They’re trying to create image. They’re visual learners. Right? If they look to the side, they’re auditory learners, that’s going to be the lowest percentage of auditory learners. Yeah, if they look down, they’re looking towards their feelings. Those are people that need to be Be like they need to be kind of guided through things physically. So in those three situations, so let’s say we got a kid who’s a visual learner. I’m a visual learner, right? So

like, I learned to play tennis years and years ago, 20 years ago, and I could not get the hand painted, but I kept hitting like a baseball right, okay to hit it on our court. And also be like these, like, 15 year old kids started hitting the ball with topspin. And I was like, Oh, you mean like that? Okay, I could do that. And like, I got it like two seconds. I’m a visual learner, even I’m learning to play the bass guitar, the bass guitar, because my son’s playing the drums. He told me if I could learn to play bass, that’d be good for him. And so, I’m trying to do all these facts and get it and also watch this guy who taught it like looking to go this, this, this, this, this, and that makes him song and you got all these videos. I’m like, Oh, I get that now. Like, okay, here, here, here, here. Here. Got it. So I’m a visual learner. Yeah. an auditory learner, someone who needs to be explained things. Right. That’s gonna be Your well was one of feeling a perceptive learner is going to be the one that needs to be like, hey, look, your arms need to be in this position need to stand like this, where you feel the ball, like you need to put them into things, they need to feel that more. Everyone needs a combination of all three. Right? But what you want to do is you don’t want to have a kid who is a visual learner who’s got a coach who can only coach him through lecturing or through demonstrating. So you want to be able to teach. So that would be another another reason that our kids don’t learn. Or kids don’t respond to that, you know, so there’s a kid who’s a kid who’s a physical learner, and you got some guy yelling at him. Yeah, I’m just gonna shut down. Yeah. Yeah. And also to there’s nobody performs under any kind, you know, maybe higher level athletes, but any like amateur athletes. I mean, nobody really performs well, under stress. You know, there are people that respond to situations and to pressure and stuff like that differently. But stress is something very different. Very different. You saw like even LeBron James, right? He’s been graded this year, you understand? He did not perform. You know, there was a difference between pressure and stress last year pressure, right? You’re sure you tell me distress? Yeah.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Wow. So, so the not to take too much more of your time. But where do you see things going? You know, what’s the future because the world’s going to keep moving fast. You know, things are gonna change faster and faster and faster. So where do you see things going?

Paul Reddick
So I’ll go two ways. First of all the way culture is going, I’m I’m terrified. Yeah, of where we’re going as a culture. Yeah. And just because I deal with somebody’s dad from a young man, I see the effects are starting to accumulate. So to the fathers who are listening to that, there has never been a more important time in history for a while. To have a connection with his son. And if a father is not willing to any child, I deal with a lot of fathers and sons. So just, you know, please excuse the vernacular. But if you do not step up to father, your children, there are corporations who are lined up to take your place. Right now, somewhere in the world, there is a meeting room at a social media company in a video game company and an app game company that are trying to figure out ways to design their products that will get our son’s addicted to it. They’re finding ways to get them addicted to social media. They’re finding ways to get them addicted to video games and apps with all kinds of rewards and badges and, and levels to attain and color scheme that hit parts of your brain. And so there’s even actually a course at Stanford about the psychological involvement of apps is a business course that teaches people how to how to create apps that create more psychological involvement. So basically, how to get how to get your kids into Stanford, this isn’t like, you know, there are pornography companies that are trying desperately to make sure that your son see content that’s not appropriate to them. And that has become a major, major, major issue I’ve been dealing with a lot of young men with. So there is there is there are people that are actively out there that will gladly take your son’s attention. If you cannot keep it will gladly steer your son your children in a different direction if we’re not careful.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
For me from from baseball perspective,

Paul Reddick
this is I think, for me, it’s an exciting time because I think baseball is poised to make some changes that might make the game more exciting. However, where I think it’s going, I think, I think the idea of Major League Baseball making some rule changes and somehow it will trickle down to the low level is insane. The changes are going to come from some tournament director. They’re going to be a tournament director who’s going to run 36 teams and seven in a game or sixth inning game. However many teams you can stop in their games per day. And he’s going to go Hmm, you know what, maybe if we play for the games, we play two hours instead of three and three balls that afford two strikes instead of three and we start with a runner on second. And we keep you know, we can play more games, we got more teams, we can make more money. That is coming. That is 100% going to come there’s gonna be speed baseball. Now, here’s the other thing. As much as like as with me, you were like, oh, man, like That’s terrible. Like we were dinosaurs. Right? We we want to say as you’re gonna say, they’re not wrong. The guys who are cooking this stuff up, they’re not wrong. Because what’s the biggest issue facing tournament baseball, travel, baseball, pitch count, and pitching in groups while you play for any name and that takes care of that. Right. So they’re not they’re not all wrong. And I told the coaches, I tell the coaches, like, if we want to remain dinosaurs, they will remember us by all fossils. Because we will, the game will change. And so what I think could happen is I think that’s gonna change. So you may have a six year old seven year old now that when these changes come, he’s gonna be playing that game for eight 910 years. And then when he gets to high school and college, and now college team is recruiting him to play baseball, and this is him playing for it for any speed baseball for the last eight years. They’re they’re gonna try and teach them a game. This kid doesn’t know how to play. Yeah. Right. So this is going to come up from the ground up, that is not going to come from Major League Baseball down, it’s gonna come from the ground up. What’s interesting, too, is that Major League Baseball has a big problem with excitement. Right, but youth baseball does not have an excitement problem, right? You face what probably more exciting now. I mean, I’m not I’m not a huge fan of it, but for the people that are in it. It’s exciting, right? So I That’s gonna change. I think you’ll see it’ll start with high schools and colleges switch to more tournament based play just to be the way it is. Right? There’s just not going to be, you know, I think that’s going to be probably, I don’t know, predicting it is very hard, right? Yeah. But I also think to that, I think whoever, if you are a 15 year old kid playing the game today, by the time you are in college, the game will change, especially if you are a pitcher, with two major changes coming and pitching it. One would be the clock, the pitch clock, right, that’s going to have it’s going to limit the time between pitches now that has a catastrophic effect on our pitchers recovery, right. So pitchers are not gonna be able to train the way they trained, they’re not gonna go to control the pace of the game. So you can’t control the pace of the reps. You’re gonna have to train different so pitchers are gonna have to train more intensely to be able to recover faster to throw more pitches in less time. So that’s going to change I think it’s going to change the way pitching staff Go. The first thing you’re going to see is is a rise if you can imagine even further rise in pitching injuries. Oh, yeah. Because of that, right. The second thing is balls and strikes. Like we are headed to computers calling balls and strikes. Yeah, they have it in tennis. The you know the how it works perfectly in tennis. It’s an accepted part of tennis. And so now the way you pitch. Remember Greg Maddux getting those pitches five, six inches off home plate? Yeah. Because he was around the plate all day, and he knew he could get one of those from the umpire if he needed them. Well, the computer is not going to give you that call. Yeah, you know. So now you’re going to have to pitch in the zone a lot more. So now if you think about from a pitching standpoint, you’re going to be pitching about shorter time to pitch you got to recover faster with the pitch at a faster rate and you got to keep the ball around the plate. You’re not going to get you’re not going to get any call. You’re not going to get a margin call. So if you’re a hitter, the future is As a great, big, beautiful tomorrow, if you are a hitter, if you’re a pitcher, I think we have major changes to the way you pitch your his key 14 or 15 year old pitcher, the way you pitch in college will be radically different from the way you pitch.

And so all those all those are, you know, I think play so now your father, your father of a 10 year old kid, and he wants a cell phone to get on all these apps and games and all these others, and then he’s cheating. You’re training him for a game that is going to be changing differently, you know, so it’s a lot. You know, it’s a lot that’s going on the one thing we don’t know what’s gonna happen. We don’t know when it’s gonna happen. But the one thing we can count on, the things are going to be continually be different. A lot different. Yeah. So it’s interesting. I mentioned I’m curious to see how Major League Baseball continues to handle it. I think I think what you saw in Bryce Harper, Manny Machado was far more impactful than maybe people think because here, Philadelphia Philadelphia and San Diego are not exactly baseball utopias, right? You know, Philadelphia is a good good town. But this is not Boston, New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, that like three years ago, right, they were predicting that one of those teams is just going to back up the Brinks truck for Bryce Harper and giving $400 million. Right. And now you see you got you got the three Highest Paid players in baseball and Philadelphia, San Diego and Anaheim. Yeah. And I think what was what teams are seeing and what our bodies that I have in baseball are saying, if you want to make money in baseball, it’s putting a winning team on the field. Yeah, and a winning team. You don’t need superstar players. You know, it’s not like basketball. If LeBron James signed with the Knicks, the Knicks would be sold out every night. And they could go 500 you know, but, but Mike trout coming to the Cubs or the red that doesn’t guarantee that, you know, they’re gonna be sold out every night. You know, they still got to put a winner on the field and I think what the sports science and the sabermetrics and the stats All the all this all this informations coming in and you’re saying that, you know, you don’t need big players to put winning winning teams on the field. So I know that was a long answer, but no, no, no bear on that one.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Yeah, so obviously, you know that there’s this concept of, you know, everything kind of operating like a pendulum. And you just got to keep pushing one way far enough just to see how far too far. So So with the data and the animation stuff, how much further Do you think that’s going to go? Because, I mean, we’ve already seen some teams thing, you know, maybe we’ve gone a little too far. And then they’re kind of starting to work back toward the middle. But there’s also some teams that are gone. Way, way, way too far the other way. So how far does that have to go?

Paul Reddick
I think from a majorly human perspective, I think it gives us For teams that don’t have huge budgets like Houston, like Oakland, right like Pittsburgh, that that it’s a competitive advantage, right that could they somehow get a team together based on all of these metrics that could win games? Right. So that’s exciting. In that respect. Mark Fisher made a great point on at the end of last year, he was doing play by play and he said, Look, you could bring in the world’s leading experts on all of this information, all this data, and you could have put them in the Baltimore Orioles still would have lost 100 games last year. Right. You know, so at the end of the day, human beings do have to go out and play. Yeah. Um, I think you know, so I think the bigger thing is when the machines get on the field, you know, when they’re calling balls and strikes, that’s going to take an element of the game out, I think, even it’s going to take a little bit of the drama out of the game, that little adversarial relationship between a manager and umpire that kind of always there in the game, right. Um, so yeah, I think there are some people in that world that looked at that are driving that world that look at baseball as a fantasy league and as a video game, that if you just put all these things into play, it should spit out this. I just don’t think you know, at the end of the day, it’s like human beings still have to do it and human beings are not machines they don’t always perform the way they do even though there may be some statistics or averages that they can apply to that you know, you can’t say that okay, if that you could say if this picture makes this pitch to this spot against this hitter Hill hits 240 but you can’t say that if he gets the pop up that you said he’s gonna get you can’t say that the guy is going to catch it. Right Riley players still drop balls, right? They drop ball. If players swing and miss at pitches they should crush and pitchers. You know, make pitchers you know, throw balls away and throw balls in the dirt or Yeah, so there’s just a human element to the game. No. And I think that I think in these situations, they tend to self correct. You know, I think there’s always a sway and remember when there’s when the Red Sox did bullpen by committee and they thought that was gonna be a big thing. And then, you know, there was all you know different things. So I always think that the game self correct. I think the biggest problem baseball has right now is a three hour baseball game. Yeah. And, and I can’t remember the time I watched the whole baseball game. Yeah. Yeah, we watch it here and there with Aaron judge up and standing up. You know, we’re Yankees jersey. So you know, I can’t remember the last time I sat down and watch a whole game, but I did watch the whole Duke basketball game on Sunday, or whatever that was, you know,

Geoffrey Rottmayer
yeah, you know, they’re using the numbers in the data to almost put, you know, a value on guys. So, so if a guy ages then his bat B goes down. Does that get used against him? Yeah, you know, so it’s like, we’re not even valuing, you know, past performance anymore.

Paul Reddick
Yeah, and I think I think also, you know, I think the contracts that you’re going to see those, I think you’ll see those be really different. Yeah, um, you know, especially for a pitcher, I think especially for pitcher I don’t think you’re going to see many big contract, especially now as you see that these matchups of relievers and hitters and the data drives these numbers that say, Hey, you know, keeping a starting pitcher in the game for too long, it’s statistically bad. And so now four innings is like a great start five innings is like, Wow, you really run crazy for us. Yeah, I pulled the guy out with a no hitter the other night. Right. And, and so but so now like, are you gonna pay a guy $35 million to pitch for any? Right? You know? So that’s it’s it’s difficult. It’s a difficult thing and you can’t you also cannot argue that one dominant pitcher in the right spot can can carry your team through a postseason we’ve seen that Kevin Brown, Pedro Martinez, right. Have you seen that? So I like it. I think it’s something that will self correct. I think it’s a new shiny new toy for baseball, I think it probably saved them some bad contracts. Um, you know that that there is some validity to it on the flip side of that the one measurement of batting average, right tells kind of one story of a hitter. So let’s say 1015 years ago, you had a guy hit in 250 and double A like, I don’t know, hit 250. But now they’re looking at exit velocity, bat speed, and they’re like, Ah, you know what, he’s hitting the ball hard. Maybe he’s just getting a little unlucky, or maybe he’s just in the ballpark better, but whatever, you know, I mean, so on the flip side of that, there could be some, some some data that will help players that maybe would have gotten overlooked based on previous stuff. True, you know, data so true.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Well, Paul, this has been awesome. So though, for someone that’s listening, and they want to kind of jump on a call with you, you know, what’s the best way for them to do so?

Paul Reddick
Yes, they go to places Got your baseball Education Center comm is the main hub for kind of all the programs we produce, and then baseball dad show calm and they can link to, you know, all the stuff that we do there. We got a lot of kind of stuff they can download over there and get in touch with me from there.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
All right. Well, Paul, sir, I appreciate your time.

Thank you for listening to our conversation on the baseball awakening podcast. Stay tuned for our show next week.

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Download now: Ep. 48: 567 Academy with Paul Reddick | A Baseball Podcast

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Geoff Rottmayer

Geoff Rottmayer is the owner of Athletic Mission Baseball Academy, a training facility in Tulsa Oklahoma. Geoff also host The Baseball Awakening Podcast, which was developed to provide content to the baseball community straight from the source. In addition that that, Geoff, is helping coaches and professional start their own podcast and find their own voice.

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