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Former MLB Player

Ep. 66: A Talk About Running, Defense, and Offense With Former Big Leaguer Greg Golson | A Baseball Podcast

Geoff Rottmayer March 16, 2020 3


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A Talk About Running, Defense, and Offense With Former Big Leaguer Greg Golson

Welcome to The Baseball Awakening Podcast, where we dive into the raw, unfiltered, unsexy side of player development

Guest Bio:

Greg Golson, Former !st Round Draft pick and Big Leaguer for Philadelphia Phillies, Texas Rangers, and New York Yankees

Summary:

On this episode, Host Geoff Rottmayer sits down with Greg Golson, Former Big Leaguer for the Philadelphia Phillies, Texas Rangers and New York Yankees.

Show Notes: In this conversation, Greg talks about:

  • His journey as a player.
  • How he developed his speed.
  • The thought process he had when he was on the base path.
  • The thought process he had on stealing bases.
  • He thoughts and favorite piece of technology.What he would focus is eye on while on the path.
  • His approach in the outfield.
  • How he stayed present during games.
  • His thought process about reading hitters to help him get a jump.
  • His approach as a hitter.
  • When he figured out what kind of hitter he was.
  • What his thought process was in the batters box.
  • Dealing with slumps
  • and much more.

Website: www.baseballawakening.com

Facebook: Baseball Awakening Podcast

Twitter: Baseball Awakening Podcast

Instagram: The Baseball Awakening Podcast

Email Address: geoff@baseballawakening.com

Geoffrey Rottmayer
On today’s show, we’re sitting down with Greg Golson, a former big leaguer and we’re talking some baseball, but we’re getting into it mind as well.

Intro
Welcome to another episode of the baseball awakening podcast where we dive into the raw, unfiltered unsexy side of player development. Get ready for some knowledge bombs with your host Jeff rottenmeier.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Welcome to baseball with your podcast. I’m Geoff Rottmayer. Today we’re sitting down with former first rounder and big leaguer, Greg Golson. Greg played for the Philadelphia Phillies, the Texas Rangers and in New York Yankees, Greg, how are you sir?

Greg Golson
I’m great. How are you?

Geoffrey Rottmayer
I’m doing great man. Listen, you are a guy who got drafted in the first round. And you got to play in the big league, you know, something a small handful of guys Got to do. But we appreciate you coming on and you know, just kind of learning about, you know, the process that that you went through to make it to the big leagues. But let’s just kind of start with you talking about your journey. And then I’d like to kind of get into your mind about Bates running out fielding and permitting.

Greg Golson
Well, you know, I grew up in Austin, Texas, and you know, it’s a really good baseball culture down there and it’s getting bigger right now they got some huge perfect game facility are complex that they’re building out and huddle around rock. So you know, you know, growing up in Texas, you can play baseball pretty much year round, and I had a late start playing I think I started playing at nine years old, but the first time I hit a baseball and I saw it kind of get smaller in the night sky. I was like, Oh, I want to do this for a long time. And, you know, like, you know, my brother played football, my sister played volleyball and you know, my sport was baseball, but we’re all you know, really come appetitive So, I feel like that kind of helped me on the baseball scene, especially getting the late start, you know, just kind of wiggling my way to success. And, you know, it was kind of crazy. I wasn’t always fast. It was like my junior year of high school, like I all of a sudden got a lot faster and got a lot stronger. And that was when a, you know, a lot of the national attention got, you know, started coming my way. And I started getting scholarship offers, and they started talking about the draft and it was a whirlwind. I mean, I, it seems like it was yesterday, but it seemed like it it went by so fast, like I couldn’t even I couldn’t even like, I don’t know how to explain it. It’s just it was so fast and whirlwind and so surreal that you know, it was all happening that I look back on and I’m like, man, crazy. But you know, looking back on the career now, like, I went, you know, playing 16 years and going all over the world to play like it’s been awesome so far. I can’t wait to see what what’s next.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Very cool. So let’s, let’s jump back to your, your junior year when I read up about you, a lot of people like your speed and your range and all that stuff. So it wasn’t until you junior year that you got stronger and faster. Can you can you talk about that a little bit? Was there something that you worked on or what? Were just simply getting stronger? What helped you?

Greg Golson
Well, I think is, you know, I didn’t really break 100 pounds until like my sophomore year of high school. So I think it was just, you know, me kind of being a late bloomer and just being that and really, really skinny kid. And, you know, my brother was five years older than me, he played football at the Naval Academy. So, you know, my eighth and fresh my eighth grade year in freshman year, you know, he was coming home from, you know, from school and bringing home like, supplements and letting me like, you know, do his workouts and stuff. So I think that that had a lot to do with me gaining, you know, so much weight and strength, but I think honestly, it was just me kind of, you know, after my sophomore year, I quit basketball and kind of focus On baseball a little bit more and really started playing it year round, you know, with no distractions and I think that was kind of what, what really made me kind of come into my own.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Very cool. So as you progress with the with the running speed was there did that or just did you did did did you do anything to kind of improve that, like was there a technique that you were trying to study or learn and and how did that whole thing go?

Greg Golson
Um, well I mean, you know, with with doing, you know, the the showcases and stuff, you know, just like any test like you’re taking a T they have like sh t prep and you kind of learn how to take the test. A lot of a lot of my speed. You know, advancements had to do with me just working on my running form, really, and, you know, so many people just assume that, you know, if you’re fast, you’re fast, you don’t have to work on it. And if you’re slow, you’re slow. There’s no use and working on it. So you know, I forgot who it was. It was One of my coaches that that your fats but you know think about how much faster you would be if you actually worked on it and that you know that was something that kind of caught my attention so I really wanted to make you know speed one of my caring tools and and honestly it worked out I got a lot of national attention running you know from home to first and running 60 and 40 So, you know, a lot of that just had to do with me learning how to run properly especially in a test setting where like you know, you’re on a 60 you run 6060 yards and you know, how often does that happen in a baseball game you know, running a straight line so I think some of the tests that you know show speed don’t really show like a clickable game usable speed, but you know, if you can do the test the right way Then who’s gonna blame me

Geoffrey Rottmayer
right now that that’s the speed tool, something that I talked to you guys a lot you got developed back there the need for that because it seemed It’d be kind of a lost art with the with the big power tools nowadays. So I think speed tool is huge if a guy can develop that for sure. So with that, you know the use that that I want to talk into about more is you know having having the tool and then having playable tool to different things. So you know being fat doesn’t necessarily mean you’re gonna make all the plays in the outfield still all the bases and all that stuff. So let’s start with on on the base path. What what’s what’s going through your mind like what how do we become a better bass runner?

Greg Golson
You know, it’s a good question. You know, a lot of it has to do with just you know, knowing the situation and you know, knowing knowing knowing a batter knowing you know what pitches have come You know, recently knowing that the runners arms because, you know, there’s a base there’s two base coaches out there, but you know, You know, your own speed, you should be able to, you know, send yourself and hold yourself up, you know, because you’ve been playing the game for a while. So, you know, I think a lot of being a good base runner is just, you know, paying attention and not thinking that I’m on base, I can just, you know, kind of relax because you see it all the time. You know, guys get on base and they’re, you know, having a full conversation with a guy even as they’re leaving off, you know, laughing and joking around. And, you know, that’s, you wouldn’t do that when you’re hidden. You wouldn’t do that when you’re pitching. You wouldn’t do that when you’re playing defense. So, you know, and a lot of times, it’s the first date like first baseman are known for talking to base dealers, you know, in a, in a friendly joking way to get them kind of distracted and not focused on feeling basis. You know, and I remember later in my career, I just go along and play with it, you know, like, act like I’m talking and then just take off mid sentence. Yeah.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
So what were what were some of the things and you mentioned a couple situation count that like that. What what other one other thing are you paying attention to While you’re sitting there at the base, or maybe even when you’re in the dugout, prior to getting on base,

Greg Golson
kind of like, you know what the pitcher was like his body language and how he you know how he’s handling runners without, you know, how he’s handling the game without runners on dates and how how he channeling and width. And a lot of guys can’t really pitch with runners on base, you know their deal and deal and deal and then somebody gets on base and they can’t pitch out a stretch, you know, for whatever reasons. So a lot of times it’s you know, first trying to see, you know, what their tendencies are and what kind of makes them tick or annoyed. And then after that, you know, it’s, you know, if I’m going to steal a base, I want to know, you know, a lot of times people that are talking about base dealers, they always talk about, you know what to look for, you know, if a pitcher is gonna pick, well, honestly, I don’t care if he’s gonna pick, I can get back. I’m more worried about when he’s going to the plate. You know, like, I don’t need to know when to go back. I’m only 10 feet from the base that Mac, right? I’m trying to go another 80 feet. So I want to know what he does to go sometimes, you know I have to do it looks, you know, crazy I, you know when I was at the Yankees I spent a lot of time in the video room just kind of trying to pick up tendencies and things that pitchers do and it’s crazy. One of the things I found was, you know, when a when a when a catcher puts a pic on or you know, the manager, whoever puts it on and gives the sign to the pitcher. A lot of times, and I’m giving away trade secrets here but sorry. A lot of times when the whatever the pitcher looked at first, that’s what he’s gonna throw out. So like, you know, I I’m leaning in and getting the sign from the catcher. If the catcher puts on a pig, I’m probably going to come set but as I’m coming set, I’m going to pick up my target at first base, and then I’ll check home plate and the opposite goes through, you know, he puts down a fastball or whatever. I’m going to take up my target first and then I’m going to check it You know, first base. So a lot of times, you know, subconsciously pitchers do things that kind of tell you what they’re going to do. And it blew my mind how many guys did this? Like, at the big league level to like, whatever they look at first, probably what they’re going to throw up. And of course, guys are going to change it if they hear this, but, you know, I think a lot of it just has to do with, you know, paying attention, you know, something DJ, like me, you told me was, was awesome. When I was at the Rockies, he goes, you see a pitcher shake twice, more than likely he’s not going to pick off because he’s worried about the hitter. You know, so, you know, it’s those things that kind of come with experience where you’re like, you know, I’m noticing this tendency, you know, a lot of times the guides have their own personal things that help them steal bases, and it’s like, you never really know but you know, five to 10 extra stolen bases a year it can be a lot, you know, I can win some ball games. Right.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Wow, that’s that’s awesome. Wouldn’t you when you start talking about that, you know, I remember having a conversation with a few people. And they keep saying that that’s too much that you’re thinking about too much. And not really, I mean that all in all that is information to help you be a better bass owner.

Greg Golson
Yeah, I mean, if they always stayed in the minor leagues, and you know, when you get drafted, they say, for the most part, everybody’s tools are pretty around, you know, human level, you know, you got your freaks like trout and guys that can do everything, but for the most part, everyone has the same, you know, amount of ability overall, but what the separator is, is the mental you know, and if you’re not paying attention to what the game is giving you then how do you expect to be able to use your mental to, you know, get an edge, right.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
So whenever you’re there and you know, you got a pitcher, who you’re really really successful off of and he did get a little, you know, nervous up there. How do you use that to your advantage at the base runner.

Greg Golson
Um, I mean, I know a lot of times it’s a pitchers cat like a really quick move to the plate or quick feet and you can take you off. A lot of times, bass runners don’t realize that they do just as much disruption by just being on base. So I, you know, whenever I could tell a pitcher was really paying attention to me on bass, I would just shut it down. You know, because if he’s focusing on me, that’s a little bit less focus that he has on the hitter, and you know that that sinker gets a little flatter or that curveball hangs a little bit or he gets a little bit more of the plate on his fastball because he’s trying to be quick to the plate. You know, a lot of times, you know, as a base runner, your goal is to score you know, so if you can score from first, why why risk it and you know, Possibly, you know, change the game in a way that, you know, isn’t really beneficial for the team. You know, like, I’ve seen a lot of guys try to get their numbers up, you know, in basis, you know, and the guys that hit behind them end up hating it because, you know, either they’re running in the bad times or, you know, to hitters count and, you know, it messes up their focus because some hitters not like when, you know, hitters don’t some hitters don’t like when base runners are jumping around on the basis causing a distraction because it it just ends up messing with their field of vision, especially at second base. You’re already in scoring, you’re already in scoring position. So you know, a lot of times it’s it’s just knowing the game situation and trying to figure out how you can best fit into it without you know, I don’t know making it all about you. Of course, there’s guys that get on base and, you know, they just disrupt it, just because that’s the nature they have. If there’s a hitter that is, you know, an RBI guy You kind of want to let that guy swing If not, you know get to a scoring position and then shut it down so that he can swing

Geoffrey Rottmayer
I was just gonna ask though how you know how the batter impact while you do on the base path know the type of hitter guy he is

Greg Golson
um i think i think if you know you got it you got to understand like a lot of times I would get on bases when the pitcher had want to inherit how to how to count because you know, especially to strip out you know, if he gets to two strikes more than likely he’s going to be a little bit more defensive so you know, as a base runner, probably not going to it’s probably not going to put something in the gap that would allow you to steal so if I’m at first our allow you to score other than what I’m saying is so you know if if he comes up and you know it’s Oh to count to in any I’d rather him have him leading off anything with a fresh count. You know? As opposed to trying to battle and put something in play, and then we lose the base runner and the hitter. So, I think it’s, you know, depending on the hitter a lot of times like, for instance, say a guy’s up that struggles with breaking balls. Well, they probably have you hitting in front of them because Are you probably a speed guy hitting in front of him because, you know, when he’s on base, the guy that gets breaking balls will probably get more fastballs. But if you’re, if you’re watching the, you know, the at bat on base, the pitcher throws, you know, two or three straight fast balls and you know, the pitchers tendencies. One of the likely one of those next couple of pitches is going to be a breaking ball and that’s a good time to run on. You know, so paying attention to, you know, a lot of like, there’s so many subtle things like how the catcher set up, you know, where the infielders are positioned. You know what the count was, there’s so many things that can kind of help you get an edge and kind of feel like you have a little bit more confidence when you make a decision or decide to go.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Very cool and then with that you gotta pay attention, that the name of the game paying attention. Whenever you do that, when you get into that position, you’re you’re able to tap into that and help the team win. So when you’re, let’s say, when you’re on the bass, what are you looking at? Are you looking at the feed? or What are you looking at? I know everybody’s different, but what did you What did you look at?

Greg Golson
Well, you know, at the beginning of my career, I would always look at you know, their shoulders or I would have a hard focus on their body you know, after you know, watching them I this is this guy’s tell this is what he does. But as I got older I started on I started seeing that having such a hard focus on one thing, you kind of lose sight of, you know, the person as a whole, like the whole image of them and a lot of times their body language gives away when they’re about to go. So instead of looking at one specific thing, I Which is kind of have a soft, General focus looking at him in general, you know? And, you know, over the years watching so many guys go to the plate, you can just kind of, I don’t know, I don’t know if it’s a hunch or if you actually see something but you just kind of have that. That feeling of Okay, he’s about to go to play. You know, I feel like that’s to me that’s the the thing that kind of separated me once I realized that it was like I didn’t have to focus on you know, his foot or or that you know, sometimes you have to do that when the guy’s got a really good move left he’s got like a block move or something. And situations situation. Yeah, I want to know when he’s going, he’s going to come pick because most of those guys you don’t really want to run on anyway because it’s an out. So that’s, that’s kind of where I’m at with that is I don’t really want to look at one specific thing. But I’ll just kind of take in his whole, you know, the whole scene and see what’s going on and have a better read of what’s going on.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Cool. So are you watching the baseball flight when he releases it? Or what do you Where do you go from there?

Greg Golson
So when it comes to that, I’m kind of just kind of looking at his numbers, but looking everywhere, I guess, hard to kind of explain what I mean. But yeah, I’m just kind of looking everywhere and then, you know, once he, once he makes his move, say it’s a righty, and he lifts his foot and he’s going to the plate, then I’ll you know, take my first couple steps and then I’ll peek to see if, you know, one if he did deliver the ball, usually they did and it’s ready. But I’ll peek in and see you know, if he’s there if the you know, the catcher’s got a good you know, pitch or if the hitter makes contact, you know, but for the most part, once I see movement, I’m not really trying to hesitate make sure I’m just going you know, like, once I see movement, and I think he’s going to play any, any any form of hesitation will probably make you lose a half step. Yeah.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
What about out. What about when you’re when you’re not stealing? Are you? What are you watching after the ball get delivered? Were

Greg Golson
just kind of the hitting zone like, you want to you want to watch flight in case you know there’s a dirt on you can you can read a time you advance on a dirt ball. That’s huge. You know, you do that 10 times in the season and that that probably results in eight runs. You know what I mean? Because it Yeah, you don’t have to give up an hour. You don’t have to give you don’t have to swing the bat. You just advancing on the play. And it’s it’s huge. I don’t think enough teams do it because they don’t realize how hard it is for the catcher to fight like block it, find the ball, pick it up, and then throw it on the move. You know, like, it’s hard for them to do that. So I’d say just close the questioning and I’m sorry, I kind of lost my train of thought there.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
What are you looking for when they’re when you’re not running the base or when you’re not? Are you looking to bottom flight or what are you looking at hitting down?

Greg Golson
Yeah, just kind of trying to advance Without like, if you’re not feeling you want to try to advance without stealing, if that makes sense, like, yeah, just because you’re not stealing doesn’t mean okay, I’m going to be here for the rest of the evening until someone hits it. You know, it could be, you know, the pitcher and catcher forget to call time or something or whatever it is, you know, be opportunistic. So that, you know, you look like the smart ball player, especially when you have speed or don’t actually, when you don’t have speed, you know, being opportunistic is probably the best way to make yourself more valuable to the team by just you know, being a slow guy that can advance a bass, you know, because they don’t expect it. But, you know, if, if I’m not stealing, a lot of times, I’m trying to, you know, in my mind, I’m trying to figure out something about, you know, this pitcher or this catcher, something that they do so that the next time I’m up or next time on base. I have, you know, I have experience with this particular pitcher and I can kind of have a better read.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Cool, cool. So what about the the catcher? Does that play a role in your mind at all? Who’s behind the plate?

Greg Golson
Very little. I mean, you still on the pitcher for the most part. You know if the pitcher is quick to the plate, you probably not gonna steal on them, you know stomp some catchers have ridiculous arms and come back pick. So you have to be aware of that or, you know, they like to call a lot of fast balls when runners on base. So it’s kind of one of those things where, you know, you got to know your opponent because it gives you a really good feel on you know, what the game plan should be. Like. I remember there was one catcher, and I won’t say his name, but he was super lazy. And, you know, if, if, if he wasn’t getting if he wasn’t hitting, you know, he was even worse. So it was like you kind of had to know how he was doing offensively. And if he wasn’t doing well offensively then go ahead and get to the races because, you know, he was a prospect that didn’t really need to be defensively inclined.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Cool. So, you know, in the in the day of the latest news at the Houston Astros, when you’re on deck and bait, are you trying to steal signs? Are you trying to look in or what what? What’s your goal? I mean, obviously, the goal is to get home better, in turn the trying to figure out what the pitch coming and helping the hitter is that does that come in your mind at all?

Greg Golson
I mean, there are a couple times in my career where the teams that I’ve been on we would, we would have some way to relay the signs that if the signs are obvious, you know, like, of course, that’s a part of the game if the team’s not going to be smart enough to have deceptive or signs that you can’t correct and that’s their fault. But, you know, there were times when you know, we would You know, give location like the catcher would set up early, that’s the catchers fault as he sets up early, you know, and if you know the location, for the most part, you kind of know what the pitch is going to be, you know, they’re not throwing any breaking but breaking balls in. So when the guy sets up in, you know, the guys second would kind of hop off to, you know, let the hitter know what direction the catcher right and it’s so hard to tell because the guys just getting a secondary. Right. Right. So it’s like, you know, there’s ways to do it the right way if I can say cheating the right way. But right, you know, like, that’s just a part of the game. Like if a if a pitcher is tipping his pitches, you know, it’s his it’s his, the burden is on him to figure out that he’s doing it it’s now me to tell him that he’s doing it for the good of the game. Yeah.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
So you mentioned it earlier, the the positioning of the defense, let’s say when you’re on deck and bass and you know, what are you looking for what what what position Are you looking for and how much did that really play a role in in your decision to do X?

Greg Golson
On the basis? Yes. I mean, it’s a lot of times guys will guys will. Like, for instance, a three account. I think the three account is the most missed opportunity in baseball because you will you watch a big league game. When the three account happens. Most of the infielders are on their heels or they’re neat their hands are underneath. I’ve seen guys in a full squat infield because they knew the hitter wasn’t gonna you know, and I’ve seen, you know, I’ve probably in my career, I’ve probably stolen second or third, or usually second, probably 40 times on a three account because, you know, it’s a win win. You know, it’s like, you end up on first unit on second, you know, it’s a three one count with a runner in scoring position or it’s a walk, and it doesn’t mean doesn’t hurt anybody, you know, the catcher, the catcher is going to probably hold anything close to get the call, and the pitcher is probably not going to pick. So it’s, it’s kind of like, you know, the defense, you know, a lot of times on base running, it’s more about catching the defense off guard than it is, you know, just being faster and more explosive than they are, you know, I know. Like, for instance, one of my second Ironman, I was in Mexico, and I hated it that, you know, I was the leadoff hitter. And say I hit a double, or I hit a, you know, I had a single the next guy comes up and he walks. So the first and second no outs in the first inning, and the manager would put on a bunt, and to me with a three hole hitter that’s just not how you draw it up putting a bone on where one of your better hitters you know, so I you know, this happened My four games in a row. So on the fourth game, when the guy squared around out a second, I took off for third and the, you know, because the third baseman was crashing, I’m, you know, basically walked in the third and the hitter ended up being able to hit and drive in those two runs. You know, it’s kind of just more like, how can I, you know, catch them off guard, you know, depending on their positioning, like sometimes when a when a third baseman is super shifted over for the lefty. I mean, you’re probably closer to the third base to third baseman that they that third baseman is Yeah, in that situation, especially if he’s got to wait for the pitch to to cross the plate. So again, it’s just paying attention, man, like that’s probably the biggest The biggest thing when base running.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Right? I agree with you. Cool. So thanks for sharing that. So let’s move you to the outfield. I read somewhere that you got better after you got hurt Can you can you elaborate on that a little bit?

Greg Golson
Well, I mean, as a speed guy, it was kind of like I felt like I could never have enough speed you know and that being my carrying tool it was like all the balls in the air I’m running fast as I can, you know. Oh man, my dogs start barking the UPS man just told us that I’d go crazy. But you know once I got hurt but not hurt enough to not hurt enough to lose anytime I still wanted to play. It was kind of like I had to plan out my my jumps or everything a little bit better so that I was more efficient. You know, like, it’s kind of like not having your if you’re right handed dominant, like not having your right hand for a week. You know, you learn that you You can do stuff left handed a little bit better, just by just by adapting. So when I was you know, when I was like a calf or something like that I just couldn’t get to that second gear or that extra gear that you know, a lot of sprinters have. So I had to really just be more efficient with my routes. When I was hitting I thought the running out of the box before the swing, and you know, was over, you know, there were just a lot of things that allowed other aspects of my game to just get better. And then I was more able to incorporate the speed into my game once I was healthy. So it was it was it was interesting kind of handicapping me allowed me to get better. You know, you see a lot with pitchers. A lot of times organizations will take away their best pitch to develop another one. Oh, no, they won’t let them throw their changeup for the whole year because they want them to develop a slider. And you know, that’s kind of how I did it without really you Knowing I did it that way,

Geoffrey Rottmayer
right? So did was that something that you kind of figured out on your own? Or did someone did you go to Hey, do my, my I’m hurting a little bit and you know, what, can I do better? Someone’s gonna help you that or how did how did that process work?

Greg Golson
I’m not really I mean, getting old as a humbling experience, you know, like, especially in baseball and they just keep getting younger. You know, it’s just, it was kind of just like a thing that, you know, if I did if I, it was a I was new to the team. And if I were to go in and tell the trainer’s that I was hurt, I probably wasn’t going to make that team. So, you know, a little bit of motivation inspiration helped as well. But I think, you know, it really did help in that I was, you know, I played I played a little deeper, you know, or, you know, I I ran with my head up a little more on the basis so I was able to make better decisions. You know, I it was kind of like the difference between, you know, I felt like my hundred percent was was good, but I was actually doing too much I was going 120% you know, like, I don’t know how to explain it, you know, mathematically, realistically, I guess, but I was doing too much I was doing more than I needed to do. And you know, taking it away just kind of allowed me to see that, Oh, I’m still a valuable baseball player without without my speed.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
So when you’re out there in the in the outfield, and you tried all three positions What? Obviously paying attention to game is important out there as well. But what would you normal positioning and how did you How would your thought profit and your decision making and how are you going to position guys?

Greg Golson
Um, a lot of times their swing told me I mean, obviously, if you’re facing a guy that you’ve seen for a while you No, it’s tendencies and you’re gonna be prepared for, for when he comes up but you know if you see that this particular hitter is not really seeing this pitcher. Well, you know, you kind of you know adjust especially in centerfield you have the best view you know, you see where the pitch is crossing the plate and how the hitters reacting. You know, you see how they’re swinging how they’re like hips and shoulders are opening up, you see how their hands are working. So as a center fielder, that’s why they kind of put the centerfielder in charge of, you know, positioning everybody is, you know, you’re in the game and you see, okay, this guy’s not picking up, you know, such and such as fastball very well. So I’m going to move the pole side outfielder towards the opposite field gap, you know, or, you know, this guy. He’s always tried to hit the ball in the in the, you know, in the opposite field gap. So I’m in a pinch that gap or, you know, sometimes hitters they change their approach completely when they get to two strikes. And you know, a lot A lot of times, here’s the one thing that I did. my whole career is I would ask pitchers, where do they typically get hit the hardest? Like, do you usually do you usually get hit poolside? Or do you get hit, you know, line drives up the middle Do you usually would you rather me play deep or shallow in a lot of times, that’s like your best positioning because a hitter a pitcher knows, you know, every you know, every time I throw my changeup and I, and I get and I get flat the guy you know, they end up hitting into left field and knowing that that’s that’s huge for centerfielder because you take it away you take away hard hit balls. I mean, that’s, that’s a huge game changer for the for the team and the pitcher. Right. Wow.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
So what do you though What are you looking at when you’re out there like a you’re hitting, you’re looking at the hitting zone. But you’re also seeing everything that was kind of the same content when you’re on debate here. You’re seeing everything and You see everything almost that same way out there? Would you explain it that way?

Greg Golson
Yeah, I mean, before every pitch I tried to, you know, look at my mind, you know, the people who are near me so even shortstop Simon Center, the shortstop second base, left field right field and kind of know where the wall and the track is. I wanted to know all that because, you know, yeah, you’re used to it and you kind of get accustomed to where everyone plays and everyone’s abilities but, you know, sometimes a guy might see something in and make a snap decision to change during the middle of the pitch and if you don’t know where he’s at, you know, that could cause a collision. You know, a lot of times a lot of stuff on on defense is more related to just being safe, you know, keeping yourself healthy, especially in the outfield because you know, you’re running full speed. So, you know, it’s just kind of being aware of your surroundings and you know, in the outfield when you don’t have an outlet When you don’t have anything to do, you still have something to do, you know, go back up a base, even if you know the throws coming from a different direction, you know, like, just be there in case because you don’t want to be the guy that wasn’t there. Even though you probably didn’t have to be there. It’s gonna be You’re the last line of defense as an outfielder, so you always got to be running. So it’s kind of like an outfielder, you’re just getting your conditioning and if anything yeah.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
So that’s just a routine Fly ball What the What’s the general rule of thumb how to how to track that how to pick it up how to deal with it and all and catch you and all that stuff? What what would be kind of a basics

Greg Golson
Um, well, I mean, you know, as a player, I would say, just catch it. If you do that, it’s no one’s gonna have a problem with you. But, you know, I I like to get behind the ball. You know, you never really know when the when the when the instance when the base runner is going to try you. So if you set yourself up to be ready a lot of times they’ll shut it down. You know? I think if I don’t know, I feel like there’s a lot of things that go on during the course of, of a game but you know if you don’t

Geoffrey Rottmayer
I That’s a tough question, man.

Greg Golson
But I say, I’d say it’s like, if I’m, if a ball goes up, the number one priority is just making sure you have it, you know, I somebody call it so that you know, it can get caught. And that’s probably the number one thing that needs to happen. It’s just my take charge. And then after that, you know, just put yourself in a position to not be surprised once you do catch it. You know, like, you have the ball in your hand and the outfielder. The longer you have it, the more people start yelling at you, you know again, so you know with with that in mind You know, just know where the ball is gonna go. You know, before it’s even put in play, just have your scenarios in your mind. And once that happens, it’ll just kind of happen.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Cool. So, you know, when you’re out there, the game the game pretty Still, the mind can wander a little bit. Which isn’t good, because that’s when the ball finds you. But how do you how do you work through that? Like, what what would you what kind of tricks that you did? to just stay focused? Stay in it in the game. Without you’re asking. Yeah, yeah. How do you stay present and don’t?

Greg Golson
Well, I mean, I’d love baseball. You know, it’s not hard for me. Know, especially playing an outfield at a young age. It was like, I was, I knew that. If you can if you can pay attention as an outfielder at a young age and you’re probably never going to have trouble, you know, paying attention but a lot of times I just tried to, especially in centerfield I tried to, you know, Think along with a pitcher and catcher try to, you know, know what pitch is coming. You know, just because, you know, when I get back to the dugout, it really showed the pitcher that I was, I don’t know that I was in the game when I would be like, Man that, you know, to one slider that you do that first hitter was nasty, you know, you say something like that in the picture. Almost it you know, gets gets life, you know, because they’re like, oh, somebody else saw it, you know what I mean? Yeah, so like, you know, doing stuff like that, that kind of helps. But also being able to separate, you know, the three different facets of the game, you know, Defense Base, running and hitting, being able to separate them and know that you can contribute, you know, in one way or the other isn’t, you know, working, you know, say you’re in a slump, you can still you know, take away runs on defense or a lot, you know, cause runs on the basis. Yeah, very cool. jump over to hitting.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
But what are your thoughts on hating? They’re the they’re the they’re the ton of things out there the Dave 10 different beliefs. And you know, again, I don’t think any of us wrong, it just depends on you know, what you think you want to do, but what are your thoughts on let’s just start with the swing? What are your thoughts on the swing and or what should happen?

Greg Golson
Um, well, to me, I think the attempts to like, crystallize the perfect swing are all in vain. You know, like, there is no perfect swing, you know, like the metrics, you know, and all the tech that’s out right now. I feel like it’s, it’s, it’s difficult because obviously, you know, a good swing has things that indicate it was good via data, you know, via that metric. So this you know, the launch angle with this, you know, the exit velocity was this though that’s what you want to, quote unquote, strike. But I think the problem now is that a lot of people are chasing the metrics, and not, you know, the result. Like, yeah, like, you know, I was talking with, you know, one of the hitting guys that I always talk to talk to and, you know, there’s a difference between swinging and hitting. Right, you know, I, I say this all the time, because I did it quite a bit, but you can have a perfect fling, quote, unquote, perfect swing and still swinging a slider in the dirt. You know, you’re not hitting your you just have a pretty swing that, you know, looks good MVP. But if you can’t put together a plan to hit, then you’re not going to be successful. And you’re going to keep dumping money into, you know, the sources that say, Oh, this is the latest swing, though. You know, it requires that, you know, kids understand who they are, and what type of player they are going to be and how they can be valuable to the team. You know, like, it doesn’t make sense for a five, six, you know, senior in high school to try to swing like Aaron Jones. You know, like, those, those two body types are different, like there’s a way that that 516 year can be in a lineup. But my guess is it isn’t going to be as a power hitter. It just requires people to self evaluate, and come up with a game plan and then just compete. You know, like, it was earlier in my career and I was with the Rangers and I remember I was thinking too much I was in the I was in the boss trying to do this trying to do striking out a bunch because I couldn’t I wasn’t, you know, athletically free because I was I was thinking too much. And I remember Scott service. He pulled me in his office and was like, hey, look, I want you to, you know, stop worrying about all this stuff and just compete. You know, when he said it, it kind of made me mad, because I was like, What do you mean compete? competing every day? You know, I took it the wrong way. Yeah. But you know, as I, you know, when I got older, I understood what he meant, you know, and I implemented in that, you know, versus like, if, if, if you were going To face and I’m not knocking your baseball talent. But if you are going to face Nolan Ryan or, you know, one of the greatest Jews that ever lived, it’s pretty hard to get a head off of them, we can agree to that. Right? But that doesn’t mean you’re not going to swing. You know what I mean? Like, you’re still going to swing the bat. So, you know, at some point, each player has to be like, Alright, I’m good enough. I belong on this field. This is why and it’s not Oh, you know, my exit velocity isn’t good enough. I need to get that better. You know, you can hit you can hit us off 340 and be a really good hitter. You know what I mean? I just think I think the hitting the hitting atmosphere right now is way to China cookie cutter, you know, industrialized it’s produced the same but I feel like variance is what makes baseball good. You know, I’ll look at this hitter you know, look at Youkilis had that weird stance and he still is hit. He’s still hit. You know, like, I feel like everyone is trying to be the same hitter and No, I don’t think it’s I don’t think it’s good for the game. Yeah.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Yeah, no, I’m with you, I think I think we need to focus more on hitting and like guides kind of figure them topped out. But with that, you know, you talked about, you know, the hitter getting to know themselves. How, how did that profit word like how long did it take you to figure out you know, what kind of a hitter that you were?

Greg Golson
Um, well, a lot of it’s just trial and error, you know, like, you try to go deep on a pitch and it doesn’t get to the track. Find out pretty quick, whatever hitter you are. So like that, a lot of it. Just know. You know, a lot of you if you don’t, if you don’t learn what type of player you are, then you end up not being a player, you know, they, they get rid of you because you’re not you’re inconsistent. So a lot of it just has to do with knowing what you can do and trying to do that as consistently as possible. Because you know, I said this, I said this in a thing that I wrote last A couple weeks ago, like, as you get to the next level, they don’t get better, they just get more consistent. Yeah.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
The other thing that you said that I really liked, and I talked about it a lot, but there’s not a lot of people doing it the self evaluation part. So can you talk a little bit about maybe when that happened, I think it should happen at every game, you should at least have to have some type of thought process of what just happened, so that you can get better every day. But we talked a little bit about the stock valuation process and kind of one of the things you were thinking about or, or doing

Greg Golson
well, I mean, it It started with me pretty early, you know, my real my rookie ball year and I remember, you know, struggling and getting mad, you know, like the whole show of emotion to show everybody that you’re mad that you got out, you know, and I, I was like, You know what, this is, this is stupid, you know, and, you know, I, I kind of got away from doing that. Then I remember it was in Oklahoma City, I was in AAA with the Rangers and I was frustrated because I kept hitting the ball to the warning track. And every time every time I’ll do it, you know, after the game, a scout or some other guy, why don’t you want more. And that made me so mad because I was like, I know I can bond I want to show you that I can hit. And that was just me being stupid and ignorant. But, you know, I went into the swing room after the guy was at a game he was like, Alright, I’ll be at the game today. Let me show you show me that you can hit. I lined out to the warning track and field three times. I go into the swing room that’s behind the dugout and I just try to take my anger out on you know, whatever. And I end up you know, swinging a bat and hitting the turtle that’s in the swing room, you know, like a track hurdle. I end up, I end up hitting it and it you know, twist my wrist in a weird way and I end up You know, tearing a ligament in my wrist. And that was a lesson learned, you know, because I was in AAA on knocking on the door that had done this. I mean, actually, I didn’t miss any because I tried to play through it. I was swinging one handed that year in 2009. And, you know, my, my average went down. And immediately after that, I think I was hidden to 90 at the time. And I ended up the year hitting 260. And then they took me off the roster, because obviously I didn’t hit Well, you know, so it’s like that, that lesson allowed me to be more objective in my bat, you know, like, if I get out, I asked my question as soon as I’m walking back to the dugout, okay. Why did I get out? You know, and a lot, I’d say 80% of the time it was because I didn’t execute, you know, or I did something that I shouldn’t have done. So, you know, that allows me to immediately, you know, I guess, disconnect from all the emotions that come with it, and I can Get better immediately. Okay, I got out because I swing at bad pitches, or I got out because I’ve missed my, you know, my pitch on that to one pitch. You know, once you can take ownership of it, then you can begin to evaluate in a way that allows you to get better.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Yeah. Very cool. So let’s talk about, you know, we’ve all been through it, you know, the slumps. You know, it’s never easy. Nobody likes strength, but you eventually get out of it. It’s just a matter how quick and you can somewhat now’s the time you can someone maybe have control over that a little bit, just by the attitude. So what I mean, after what you’ve learned and what you’ve learned throughout your career, what what would be kind of your advice on on the guys who are slumping and how do they work through that?

Greg Golson
Um, I was talking to one of my lessons About this just yesterday. A lot of times when we slump, we think it’s mechanical. But oftentimes, it’s not mechanical. It’s just, you know, did you are you getting? Are you getting ready on time, you know, or are you? Are you seeing the ball? You know, a lot of times it has nothing to do with what you’re doing and more to do with what you’re not doing. And I think, I think, you know, whenever guys get into a slump, a lot of times they they immediately go to their hitting coach to see what what it is that they’re doing wrong. And you know, a lot of times if the coaches and I don’t know how to say if the coach isn’t aware of baseball or isn’t experienced, oftentimes they’ll go to well, you know, your, you know, your, your, your, you got a loop in your sling and you’re doing this, you’re doing that and that immediately To player into a 13 mindset that just perpetuates this struggle even more. So I think, I think a lot of times, it just requires the player to just take a deep breath and understand that it’s not gonna last forever, it’s not the end of the world. You know, like, the same way when you’re in a hot streak and you can’t get out. You know, the mistake would be to think, Oh, this is me forever now. You know, like, you’ve got to just stay on that. I don’t know, you got to stay on that, that that plane that even keel? You know, and I’ll tell you this, you know, it was a really influential point in my career when I stopped, you know, aspiring to be something and started just, I guess, I just stepped into the reality of what I aspired to be, you know, like, instead of thinking I want to be a 300 hitter. You know, I would look myself in the mirror and say I’m a 300 hitter. You know, and that helped me so much I can’t explain how much it helped me because, you know, in a game when I would be over two, I’d be running out to the outfield, and I’d be like, sorry, I’m a 300 hitter, I’ll probably get a hit this next at bat. And that there’s, I can’t explain to you how, like freeing that is, you know, like, most of the time, you know we are. We’re self conscious as ballplayers because we, we want to be the best and we feel like we don’t stack up. So it’s like when you just to yourself, you just say, you know, I’m a success or I’m a 300 hitter or I’m on you know, a dominant pitcher, whatever it is that you want to be, just say it say that you are now and I feel like it’ll just alleviate all that stress and anxiety that you put on yourself. You know, because you’re still results based, you’ve already attained obtain to the result to yourself, so there’s no anxiety anymore. So Your your routines?

Geoffrey Rottmayer
How did you come up with that? Like, what what? Did you find them at work? How long did it take you to find one that you were able to be consistent with?

Greg Golson
Well, I mean, you know, at the lower levels, it’s kind of tough to get into a routine, or it was when I was, this is like 15 years ago. So I’m kind of dating myself, but it was difficult to get into a routine because a lot of guys just aren’t aware of how important it is. So your teammates are just really inconsistent with their so trying to figure out when you can get on a consistent routine without someone else, you know, kind of disrupting it because of their inconsistency is probably the hardest challenge. And that the lower levels is that you know, your your surroundings or you’re surrounded by guys that just aren’t as, you know, professional as they should be, you know, and that’s just by design of the of the The system or the level that they’re at. But I think, you know, with, with that being said, it’s kind of like, again, I lost my train of thought what were we talking about?

Geoffrey Rottmayer
We were talking about routines.

Greg Golson
Oh yeah, the routine. So, you know, with that being said, you know, once I got to the higher levels, I just kind of stuck with the drills that made my swing feel good, you know, like, there wasn’t a, you know, a prescribed routine that I did, because somewhat such and such that it was going to help me you know, you know, some days I tried to stick to the same routine but some days whenever, you know, the field got there a little quicker, I didn’t have to complete the drill, you know, like, maybe I did it every day. And you know, finished off by doing you know, different t drill, but if I felt good after doing the T drills, The First Tee drill, I wouldn’t have to do it as much as you know at the end, just because you know, it’s a long season. You don’t want to tire yourself Without get exhausted, simply because you’re trying to follow a routine that you feel like is more of a good luck charm. Yeah.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
What about your approach? How did you? What was kind of your your guideline for developing your approach based on the pitcher, whatever?

Greg Golson
Well, I mean, it’s crazy that I didn’t fully understand what an approach was until I was about, I’d say 2625. And, you know, it’s unfortunate because I feel like I would have, I probably would have had a better time in the big leagues, if I had known. You know, what approach was, I thought that approach was, you know, what you do every time. You know, you asked a high schooler, what’s your approach? And I say, 70% of the time, they’re gonna say, well hit the ball, the opposite field. And that’s pretty much what I was. And it really makes you easy to pitch to you No pardon the way. So, you know, after, you know, after struggling with hard and soft away for, you know, seven years of my pro career, you know, I had a conversation with a guy about approach and he was just kind of talking about how it’s more than, you know, being stubborn to one approach is adapting, you know, you know, from bad to bad, sometimes pitch to pitch, you know, if I go up there and I’m like, Alright, I’m looking for the ball up so that I can, you know, hit the ball to, you know, left center field because the wind blown out. You know, if the pitcher in the throwing the fastball that looks like it rises, I’m gonna have to step out and take a different approach to that at bat because I would be susceptible to swing to chasing at the high pitch. If he has a fastball that rises, you see them saying, so it’s, it’s kind of like, you’ve got to adapt in the moment so that you You know, the cat and mouse game isn’t so, so difficult You got it, you know, you’re not one step behind. You know, like, there are times when I had an approach going up to the, to the plate. And then I saw by, you know, the pitch sequence that he threw me that there was a good chance that he was going to throw me, you know, this pitch Next, you know, for instance, like a lefty coming up, for the most part, I would try to hit lefties the other way because of the way their ball moves. But this particular time, the pitcher went, he went, fastball strike that was like middle and didn’t swing and because it was Milan, next pitch, he goes fastball way in, like, way inside. So to me, that tells me Okay, you’re a lefty that got ahead with the first strike. And then you move my feet with the second one or the second pitch, more than likely you’re going to go off speed away. You know what I mean? Because that fastball is setup that offbeat so I stepped out in you know, because of the of the hitter that I am, he’s not expecting me to stand on a changeup, especially after he set it up so well. So I sit on a changeup, and he ends up hanging a little bit, and I killed it, like I hit it out the park. And, you know, those are the type of things that you know, that, to me, those are, those aren’t necessarily approaches that you want to go to all the time, but they’re things that, you know, allow you to have a little bit of an edge when it’s when the time comes, you know, you got to be able to be fluid with the game. You know, if I had gone up there and still set up while I’m still going to try to hit the ball The other way that changed up that he threw me, you know, kind of middle in I probably would have found that offer, you know, topped it up or something instead of trying to do damage and really get the head on on that pitch because I felt like I knew what was coming. You know, the approach just kind of gives you a I don’t know if you’re convicted and disciplined in your approach. It’s almost Like you are, you know what’s coming, you know like because if it’s not if it doesn’t fit within your approach then you’re not going to swing and you know even if it’s a ball or a strike it doesn’t matter that wasn’t a part of your approach so the whole barrel control aspect

Geoffrey Rottmayer
being able to drive ball the other way and and no hid behind runners and all that stuff all that the part of the game all the stuff the the strategies that that will help you know you had the hitter to help him win games. It’s not really appreciated so much at the lower level.And that hurt guys when they kind of develop into the game a little different now. What I mean what you thought and all this you know, the not making adjustments and and Yeah, basically not hitting the ceiling.

Greg Golson
You know, I think, I don’t know, I was talking about this because, you know, I live in in Colorado right now. And a lot of the kids that I see are a product of the, you know, culture right now in baseball. And, you know, they come to me for lessons and the first thing that I, I try to see is if I try to see if they can hit a hard ground ball, you know, I want to see if the kid has the ability to hit the ball or they want to cut to me that lets me know if they can make an adjustment. You know, like, some kid has a swing that so grooved into you know, whatever metric that they are chasing. That, you know, they can hit one pitch, or they can hit one location and it’s always to, you know, the pull side. You know, and you know, when they’re 12 and in Colorado, ball doesn’t break because of the elevation in the ball goes an extra 30 feet because of elevation. So the car kind of setting themselves up for failure if they keep doing this, this, you know, this swing style because one, they’re getting a false sense of security, security because the pitches aren’t breaking as much as they will when they go out of state. But they’re also getting that fault in security, and that they’re enjoying success, you know, facing these pitches that aren’t breaking, and they’re going a lot farther than they would if you weren’t in Colorado. So the same thing can be said about the big leagues. You know, I think everyone kind of looked at the bait the baseballs this year and saw that there are a bit use. What is that? Like? How does that affect the metrics that in the metrics and the data that we’re plugging in, you know, like there’s kids in I don’t know in the Southern League that are that aren’t hitting those juice balls that are trying to, you know, adapt, adopt those swing mechanics that they’re not going to be rewarded because the ball doesn’t go anywhere in the Southern League and the pitches break in the southern week. So I feel like it’s a, it’s a slippery slope that we’re going down because, you know, I feel like the game is trying to cater to the the the Add fan that needs to have high scoring games and wants to, you know, shorten games. So it’s like, I don’t know, I feel like it’s just catering to the wrong thing. That’s what baseball is doing right now. Yeah.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Very cool. So not to not to take up too much more of your time, but the kind of wrapping things up. Talk a little bit about your blog I read, you know, I know you just kind of really started publishing. And I like what I’m reading. So I think it’s the Go Go golf@wordpress.com for people who are listening, talk a little bit about what your plans are with that and the content that you put in now, which I which I think is great.

Greg Golson
Well, I mean, I I’ve always enjoyed writing. You know, especially about baseball when I feel like I wouldn’t say that I don’t know, at all by any means, but, you know, having so much to draw from and write about, you feel like so much of baseball instruction and, and coaching these days is geared towards, you know, this is the way you got to do it. This is the right way. And you know, if you don’t, you’re, you’re an idiot. And that’s the way it’s being pushed right now and kids feel like they have to do stuff, they feel like they have to do it. And, you know, I’m I just kind of want to be that voice that says, you know, it’s your career, you know, if you want to, if you want to pitch like Mitch Williams did, you know, it’s obvious that he was successful doing it? You know, there’s there’s different ways to be successful in this game. And, you know, I feel like in my experience, because I’ve not played with eight different, you know, organizations, you know, I’ve made a lot of connections and female Lots of different variety, you know, I’ve had, I’ve probably had hundreds of hitting coach at this at this point, if not, you know, doesn’t know. So, you know, and every single one of them had a different philosophy. So, you know, and they all had varying degrees of success with that philosophy. So, to me, that just showed me that, you know, there is no correct way, you know, every every organization I went to they said, I, this is what we’re going to do, this is how we’re going to hit, or this is how we’re going to, you know, run the basis, this is how you need to feel the do or die in the outfield, like all these things, I go to different organization and they just changing. And it’s like,

Geoffrey Rottmayer
what, what are we doing, you know, I

Greg Golson
know, like, I’m an individual, I’m not going to be like, you know, whoever, whoever it is that you had success teaching this to, you know, cater to me, and then maybe we can both come to an agreement on what needs to happen for me as a player, and then you can both benefit from it. You know, But I think I’m just trying to just be a voice, another voice that isn’t, you know, falling in line with the group think that, you know, all sports tend to do and all sports are kind of copycat league. So, you know, once, once you know, it Everyone is adjusted to what’s going on now, then Steve, we’ll get back into the game and whoever is the speed team is going to be the outlier that everybody tries to copy, you know, so I just feel like baseball, it’s always, you know, as enclosed in a way that made everyone that was at the, you know, at the cusp of all the innovation think that this is a way baseball is going to be forever. But I think we are seeing more and more that, you know, regardless of what changes in the game, more changes will come. You know, like the robo umpire we play with the robo amps in the Atlantic league this year. And they’re talking about doing that and pro and you know, in the big leagues, and everyone’s calling forth and it’s great, but I don’t think they understand the unintended unintended consequences that happen when you take out, you know, human on bars. Right? You know, it’s just the game’s gonna change again when that happens because pitchers don’t have to throw certain pitches, they’re not going to throw them. You know, the game is going to get back to the big looping breaking ball because that gets more in the zone at a at a harder angle to hit, but it you know, it was never called when it was with the human umpires. But with the robot umpires that catches the very bottom millimeter of the front edge of the plate of the zone. So it’s on unhittable pitch that was probably gonna bounce, you know, before the catcher catches it, but it’s in the strike zone. Now, so the game is gonna change. I just feel like, we can’t go so gung ho and feel like oh, this is the way that it’s going to be forever. Right. What you’re

Geoffrey Rottmayer
You know, you have a lot of resources, people that you talk to, that you can rely on for in their experience and on what? What are some resources that you know, the everyday person everyday code that listen to this or parent or whoever their favorite book or what are some of your favorite resources? Within baseball, I can be whatever.

Greg Golson
Um, honestly, a book that I got into reading probably, I mean, I hated reading in high school because I felt like the assigned reading was just so boring. And yeah, I felt like anything that if someone assigned me to do something, I didn’t want to do it. But I ended up reading all of the books that I was assigned in high school. And I you know, like some of them I hated some of them, but a couple books that I really really felt like helped me to, I don’t know mature was, one was thinking Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill. And then The other one was the way of the superior man by David deida. And, you know, they both kind of are somewhat self help. But just especially the, the way of the superior man, that one kind of just, it has a way it had a way of, you know, sometimes you’ll read a book and it’s like, it sticks with you during the day, not because, you know, I don’t know, maybe it wasn’t necessarily the most eloquently put, but, you know, there’s, there’s a certain level of truth to it that you see, so clear that you hadn’t been aware of before, you know, and that was that was the day to do a book it just kind of I guess it kind of showcased or, or things into categories and perspectives that I hadn’t never. But the thinking grow rich. That’s kind of where I got that, you know, look yourself. Step into that reality. Yeah, you Because it kind of, you know, I’m not saying it’s law of attraction or a power of positive thinking, but, you know, there is something to a clubhouse when, you know, there’s one person in there that’s forever positive, you know, like, I watched a video of Russell Wilson, you know, hyping up his team just being a source of positivity no matter what, you know what I mean? And, to me, that’s like, to me, you will, you know, you make your own reality when you do that, you know, you’re just forever positive looking for the silver lining. And it’s like, you’ll find it at some point.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Yeah, no, I love that. I’ve read both books in there, I’d recommend as well. So those Good, good, good choices there. So one last question. If you were me interviewing yourself, what would you have asked that I didn’t ask.

Greg Golson
I think I would have asked what

Would that’s a good question.

Probably.

What do you do outside of baseball to to enjoy your time? And this was a, this was a shameless plug of my fantasy football dominance. Okay, you go there you go. There you go.

Geoffrey Rottmayer
Well, Greg, learned a lot here. I’m sure the listeners are gonna enjoy it as well. I really appreciate your time. Keep keep that blog going. I think it’s great. What are you doing over there?

Greg Golson
I appreciate thanks.

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Download now: Ep. 66: A Talk About Running, Defense, and Offense With Former Big Leaguer Greg Golson | A Baseball Podcast

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Geoff Rottmayer

Geoff Rottmayer is the owner of Athletic Mission Baseball Academy, a training facility in Tulsa Oklahoma. Geoff also host The Baseball Awakening Podcast, which was developed to provide content to the baseball community straight from the source. In addition that that, Geoff, is helping coaches and professional start their own podcast and find their own voice.

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